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2014 Workshops & Sessions


Tuesday, October 7, 2014

Opening Plenary 

"Through a Child’s Eyes: Understanding Addiction and Recovery"
Dr. Jerry Moe

A long-held tenet in the treatment and recovery worlds is that alcoholism and other drug addictions are a family disease. Everyone in the family, including children, gets hurt by this cunning, powerful, and baffling illness. The children witnessed the drinking and/or drugging, as well as the havoc it wreaks on everyone in its path. All too often it becomes a family legacy that gets passed from generation to generation. Where does it stop? The primary focus in the Children’s Program has always been to serve children and provide safety and guidance as they discover that they are not alone.  This prevention program helps them find a voice when it comes to how addiction has affected their young lives.

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Breakout Sessions A 

A-1 - "Celebrating Families!™ for Children Ages Birth to Three"
Presented by Rosemary Tisch, Director of Prevention Partnership International

This workshop will address the need, importance and effectiveness of working with the whole family and present an overview of the goals, structure, and distinctive aspects of Celebrating Families! for Children 0-3.  The presenter will acquaint attendees with research regarding the importance of working with young children, including the impact of attachment, toxic stress and trauma on children’s brain development.  It will include an overview of the brand new Celebrating Families!™ (CF!) component written specifically for this age-group. Celebrating Families!™ (CF!) is listed on SAMHSA’s National Registry of Evidence Based Programs & Practices and has proven to be effective with families in early recovery. The workshop will utilize PowerPoint, video, and a brief activity demonstration (requiring audience participation).

Learning Objectives:

  1. Understand the importance of family-based services
  2. Be able to describe the essential elements of Celebrating Families! for Children 0-3
  3. Discuss strategies for successful implementation with families in early recovery 

Handouts:

 

A-2 - "Partnering with Community Substance Abuse Coalitions"
Presented by Tammany McDaniel, Director of Community Initiatives, Arizona Youth Partnership

This course will provide a brief overview of three federal funding streams that provide resources to community-based substance abuse coalitions.  While there are many funding sources for substance abuse prevention, two streams flow from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) to States, and, depending upon state hierarchies flow to Provider Systems of Care or to Substance Abuse Coalitions.  A third stream flows directly from SAMHSA and the Office of National Drug-Control Policy (ONDCP) through a congressional set-aside – this money flows directly to the community.  These funds are designed to address local conditions that increase the use of drugs by children.  The funding streams all require partnership and collaboration with like-minded organizations and encourage shared goals, as appropriate.  Participants will then be provided with two examples of State Provider Systems in order to get a general understanding of how to find local substance abuse coalitions.  A directory of funded coalitions for the congressional set-aside will be made available to each participant.  In order to aid the DEC alliance members in maximizing their collaborations with local substance abuse coalitions, an overview of prevention aims will be discussed with participants.  Prevention funding has specific requirements and measurements – DEC’s can increase opportunities to be involved by sharing and using the recognized technical language.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Have knowledge of three federal funding streams that address substance abuse prevention
  2. Know how and where to find funded substance abuse coalitions in order to build relationships mutually beneficial to DEC’s and the local substance abuse coalitions
  3. Understand basic prevention language in order to quickly move to how collaboration can be beneficial to the DEC and a local substance abuse coalition

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A-3 - "Where Does Drug Use Come from and Why is it a Harm to Children?"
Presented by Dr. Randell Alexander, Statewide Medical Director, Child Protection Team, Children's Medical Services, Division of Child Protection and Forensic Pediatrics, University of Florida

Considerable research shows that drug use is largely a treatment for adverse childhood experiences, as is true with legally prescribed drugs, alcohol abuse, suicide, and smoking.  Until the parent’s underlying childhood is treated, children are at risk of neglect and abuse and perpetuating it to the next generation. Prevention of drug use is critical to reducing child abuse and identifying whether drug use has occurred is a priority of the Florida Child Protection Team system.  This session will explore the origins of drug use, how child abuse and neglect is intertwined as cause and effect with drug use, how the presence of illegal drugs in a child is abuse per se in several states, and how to discuss the nexus of harm in the child protection system.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Identify how people with adverse childhood experiences use drugs as a way to cope
  2. Be able to describe efforts to identify drug use causes and help shape prevention
  3. Be able to list ways in which drug usage is a direct harm to children by neglect and abuse, and how to make the nexus in the legal system

 

A-4 - “Today’s Emerging Drug Trends … Has the Threat Increased?”  
Presented by Sergeant Courtney Pero, Criminal Investigative Services Division, Plano, Texas Police Department

The primary focus of this presentation will be new and emerging drug trends across the country.  The overall number of substances being abused today has noticeably increased over the last five years.  Much of this increase can be attributed to the influx of synthetic drugs as well as newer forms of some existing drugs.  Substances known as “Wax”, “Dabs”, “N-Bomb”, “Molly”, “Gravel”, “Syrup”, “Snappers”, “Krokodil”, “Purple Dank”, “Cloud Nine” and “Moon Rocks” are relatively new to the drug scene and continue to increase in popularity.  These substances, along with existing substances known as “G”, “Ice”, “Boy” and “Tar” are causing an avalanche of problems for parents, law enforcement, educators, judges, medical professionals, correction officers, child welfare workers, prosecutors and others.  Attendees will be provided information on synthetic cannabinoids, synthetic cathinones and synthetic hallucinogens.  Specific drug trends, legislation and drug slang terms from across the country will be discussed.  

In addition, attendees will receive information on other trends (including Butane Hash Oil and THC extraction) as well as the resurgence of Heroin, GHB and other illicit substances.  These drug trends present an increasing threat to children across the country.  This presentation will include information on the abuse of these substances by juveniles themselves along with the potential for more incapacitated caregivers, which could result in more ignored, abused, and abandoned children.  The education of professionals from a variety of disciplines about these ever-changing drug trends will increase the likelihood that the indicators of abuse of new substances can be identified earlier, thus diminishing the threat to children.

Learning Objectives:

  1. At the conclusion of this presentation, attendees will have an increased awareness of the growing trend of synthetic drug abuse along with other relevant, current national drug trends 
  2. Attendees will be provided specific information about Butane Hash Oil (BHO), synthetic cannabinoids, synthetic cathinones and synthetic hallucinogens.  This will include information on the manufacturing process as well as specific photographic and video examples to assist attendees with the identification of these new substances
  3. This presentation will increase awareness of these emerging drug trends, causing an increased likelihood of early intervention by professionals in situations affecting children of all ages

 

A-5 - "Parenting a Child with Prenatal Drug Exposure through the Early Years of Life"
Presented by Barbara Drennen, Executive Director and co-founder of Pediatric Interim Care Center (PICC) in Kent, Washington & Denise Schmidt, Director of Nursing of Pediatric Interim Care Center in, Kent, Washington

This presentation will discuss the highly individual effects of prenatal exposure to opiates, cocaine, and methamphetamine on the infant and the importance of the caregiver in managing those effects as the child grows.  Concerns for parenting the young child include aversion to stimuli, medication, environmental issues and labeling.  Strategies include the boundaries, structure and routine.  

Learning Objectives:

  1. Identify the effects of opiates, cocaine and methamphetamine on the prenatally exposed infant
  2. Have an understanding of the concerns that may follow the prenatally exposed infant into childhood
  3. Understand strategies for helping the growing child address ongoing effects of prenatal drug exposure

 

A-6 - "Making Groups Work for Kids"
Presented by Dr. Jerry Moe, Vice President and National Director, Betty Ford Center Children’s Programs

Why do some groups work so much better than others? This workshop introduces participants to six principles for effective groups for seven through twelve-year-olds hurt by a loved one’s addiction to drugs and alcohol. Topics covered include creating a safe place, experiential learning, and cultural sensitivity.

Learning Objectives:

  1. List the six rules for group effectiveness for clinicians
  2. Describe the importance of experiential learning as a therapeutic tool
  3. Share two strategies to deepen relationships with youth

 

A-7 - "Core Drug Endangered Children Community Awareness Training"
Presented by Commander (retired) Lori Moriarty, Vice President, National DEC

The national strategy for responding to drug endangered children focuses on the formation of multi-disciplinary partnerships that take advantage of existing agency personnel, resources, and responsibilities and coordinate their mutual interests and duties to meet the specific needs of these children.  The focus on these children’s needs lasts throughout the entire process until the child is in a permanent, safe, and positive functioning environment. This session will highlight the risks to children living in dangerous drug environments, the long-term impacts these environments This session includes the highlights of National DEC's popular Core DEC Awareness Program.

Learning Objectives: 

  1. Identify the risks and actual dangers that illegal drug activities present to children
  2. Describe the long-term needs of drug endangered children
  3. Outline the broad concepts of a collaborative response
  4. Explain the advantages presented by a collaborative response in sustaining DEC efforts and engendering broad social change

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Afternoon Plenaries

"Detox: Impacting Kids who Have Experienced Toxic Stress"
Presented by Dr. Deborah Shropshire, MD, Deputy Director of Child Welfare Community Partnerships, Oklahoma

This presentation will discuss types of stress that children experience, better understand the lifelong effects of chronic toxic stress in childhood, and discuss ways that we as professionals can help change the life trajectory of those children we encounter in abusive and neglectful environments. The information provided is based on actual front line casework.

 

"DEC Promising Practices & Collaborative Leadership Awards"
Presented by Deborah Spence, Office of Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS), US Department of Justice

There are currently 25 state DEC alliances, a number of tribal DEC alliances and coalitions, and a DEC alliance in the Province of Ontario, Canada. There is also a growing interest in DEC alliances, with many more in development. These state, tribal and provincial DEC alliances are the cornerstone of the drug endangered children effort. As such, these alliances have developed programs that uniquely fit the needs of their community members and their local DEC initiatives and are structured around the legislative statutes, drug trends, and partnerships within the state, tribe or province. Even though no two state, tribal or provincial DEC alliances are exactly alike, they have many similarities, including a working partnership with National DEC, marketing strategies and branding, DEC conferences, and the delivery of DEC training, to name a few.  To facilitate discussions throughout the conference, this presentation will highlight promising DEC practices and identify the leaders behind these DEC promising practices.

National DEC Collaborative Leadership Awards… and this year the award goes to…

The success of the DEC mission depends on the passionate involvement and leadership of practitioners all across the country.  During this Session, National DEC and the COPS Office will recognize the leadership of a number of current practitioners who have provided key leadership in implementing and spreading the DEC mission, based on the following criteria.

Criteria:

  • Promotes effective collaborative partnerships across agencies over sustained period of time
  • Demonstrates leadership in facilitating relationships at multiple levels within an organization
  • Promotes the implementation of policies and protocols that improve responses for drug endangered children; and
  • Displays professional and personal strengths that advance multidisciplinary collaboration through innovative strategies

Wednesday, October 8, 2014

Morning Plenary

"Adverse Childhood Experiences & DEC: Insights from the Front Line"
Presented by Dr. Kiti Freier Randall, Director of Psychological Services in the Department of Pediatrics, Loma Linda University Health Care

The Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE) study is one of the largest scientific research studies addressing the relationship between multiple categories of childhood trauma and mental and physical health outcomes later in life.  The ACE study has demonstrated the broad and profound long-term impact of childhood experiences on adult mental health, disease, obesity, risk behaviors, and addiction. This talk will look at the Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE) study and its implications for drug endangered children.  Additionally, prospective ACE data with drug endangered children data will be presented.  Implications of the ACE study for DEC will be offered in the context of current experiences on the ‘front line’.

 

Breakout Sessions B  10:30am - 11:45am

B-1 - "Lessons Learned on How to Build a Successful DEC Effort"
Presented by Tom Dunn, Case Advocate, Emerald Coast Children’s Advocacy Center, Niceville, Florida & Patricia Franklin, Operations Manager, Department of Children and Families, Pensacola, Florida

This workshop will discuss our journey on how to build a successful DEC Effort. From receiving the Initial DEC Training through team member identification and DEC protocol development, participants will understand our lessons learned both good and bad. The workshop emphasizes the importance of teamwork and how to best work in multidisciplinary environments.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Understand our journey toward a successful DEC Effort and learn from our failures and successes
  2. Understand the importance of teamwork and using available resources
  3. Understand the importance of developing a team DEC protocol

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B-2 - “When Parents Are “Gone”
Presented by Jessie Ragan, Education Coordinator, Coeur d’Alene Tribe, Early Childhood Learning Center & Alison Dundas, Family Service Coordinator for the Coeur d'Alene Tribe Early Childhood Learning Center

Home visitors and educators often are the first to see the impacts on children of substance abusing parents.  What should you document and when should you report?  What are the impacts for children who grow up in homes where substances are used?  What does it look like in a classroom setting?  When children are raised with substance abusing parents their ability to form attachments and relationships suffer.  Let’s explore the macro, meso, and micro systems available in communities that have the ability to collaborate to provide a more comprehensive approach to providing services that will become lasting.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Know warning signs that a child is exposed to substance abuse and how to document and report
  2. Understand the impact substance abuse has on attachment and relationships between the parent and the child
  3. Create a level of analysis of the different systems available to families, and leave with a plan of action on how the participant can collaborate between systems to ensure comprehensive services for children and families

 

B-3 - "Beyond the Public Policy of Legalization: What's Really Happening to the Children in Washington State"
Presented by Esther Larsen, Spokane County Sheriff's Office, Director, Washington Alliance for Drug Endangered Children & Linda Thompson, Executive Director, Greater Spokane Substance Abuse Council

1) History of the legalization of marijuana in WA state—what the public knows and what really happened behind the scenes; 2) Examples of legislation and rule making at the local, state and national levels—yes, even the President of the United States has had input; 3) Trends from the WA state Healthy Youth Survey—legalization advocates disregard the data but prevention folks are in the know; 4) Cost—not just the Legal Retail Store price—the price on our communities; 5) Resources: How to reach out to others—who you really need in your corner when this comes to your state; 6) Advocacy/education: What/how you can and cannot do—what others can do too; 7) Lessons learned – Medical marijuana is changing the landscape just like legalized marijuana; 8) Mobilize—Be bold!--“just because it is legal doesn't make it safe”; and 9) There is hope—key organizations with exemplary data, strategies and national voices.

Learning Objectives:

  1. At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will have a basic understanding of the status as well as health and safety impacts of marijuana in Washington State, not just what is posted on official sites—what is happening in neighborhoods, apartment buildings and on school grounds
  2. At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will have gained information on strategies and resources to develop a sustainable multi-disciplinary, community-oriented partnership to combat attempts, both legislatively and by initiatives, to legalize marijuana for medical, recreational and other uses in their communities and/or state
  3. At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will have the tools to use to attempt to provide for the safety and health of children and others in their communities in the event marijuana is legalized in their communities and/or state. 
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B-4 - "Effective Strategies for Addressing the Needs of Substance Exposed Newborns and their Families" 
Presented by Dixie Morgese, Executive Director of the Healthy Start Coalition of Flagler and Volusia Counties, Florida

This presentation is designed to address the complex needs of substance exposed newborns to include managing of symptoms, perinatal health issues of the mother, and coordination of multiple service systems needed to promote successful outcomes.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Identify systems of care needed for effective coordination of services for parents/caregivers and their children
  2. Review effectiveness of methods associated with screening, assessment, and interventions
  3. Identify potential barriers to success and strategies to address them
  4. Consider staff development needs

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B-5 - "Risk Assessment in Child Maltreatment: What Every Mandated Reporter Should Know"
Presented by Dr. Walter Lambert, Pediatrician with the University of Miami School of Medicine, Associate Professor of Clinical Pediatrics and the Medical Director of the Child Protection Team for Miami-Dade County and the Florida Keys

Current state laws require the reporting of suspected child maltreatment to the various state Abuse Hotline/Registries.  These reports are made to child protective services in order to investigate and assess safety issues.  Risk is different from safety determination.  Safety is more immediate, but risk factors have implications over the long term.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Distinguish between risk factors and risk assessment in order to make better decisions about child removal, plans for permanency (reunification or adoption) and interventions needed for children and their families
  2. Identify specific risk factors associated with specific maltreatment types
  3. Understand concepts of re-maltreatment and untreatability

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B-6 - "A Closer Look: Exploring  the Intersection of Domestic Violence and Substance Abuse"
Presented by Ghia Kelly, Domestic Violence & Child Advocacy Specialist for the Florida Coalition Against Domestic Violence & Maggie Cveticanin, Disability Compliance & Later Life Abuse Specialist, Florida Coalition Against Domestic Violence

Substance Abuse and Domestic Violence are both complex issues that plague many families involved in the child welfare system. While substance abuse does not cause domestic violence, the two often co-occur and may exacerbate each other. This workshop will explore the intersection of domestic violence and substance abuse and best practices when working with families experiencing both issues concurrently. Participants will learn the myths associated with domestic violence and substance abuse and ways batterers use substance abuse to gain and maintain control in the relationship.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Participants will explore the myths associated with domestic violence and substance abuse
  2. Participants will learn ways batterers use substance abuse to gain and maintain power and control
  3. Participants will learn best practices for working with families experiencing both domestic violence and substance abuse

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B-7 - "Bringing Life and Hope to Those Impacted by Child Maltreatment"
Presented by Dr. Deborah Shropshire, MD, Deputy Director of Child Welfare Community Partnerships, Oklahoma

This session will provide information on the Fostering Hope project which seeks to interrupt the multi-generational cycle of child maltreatment.  Children who experience child maltreatment have poorer health and social outcomes than their peers. Dr. Shropshire will discuss the Adverse Childhood Experiences study, health and social outcomes, the role of community partnerships and lessons from the current Oklahoma projects targeting these poor outcomes.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Review studies related to the health and social outcomes of those who have been abused or neglected
  2. Discuss how effective community partnerships are developed
  3. Discuss some current projects/partnerships that are affecting the well-being of Oklahoma's children

 

B-8 - "Prescription Drug Abuse and Diversion, and the Abused Pharmaceutical Card"
Presented by Adrienne Baker, Associate Director of Law Enforcement Liaison and Education for Purdue Pharma

This course provides a review of the most commonly abused prescription drugs. Street names, methods of abuse and current street prices will be discussed. Each attendee will receive an abused pharmaceutical card as a reference.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Understand the problems surrounding misuse, abuse, and diversion of controlled substances
  2. Recognize state law and medical board regulations may be more restrictive than federal law and regulations
  3. Recognize current trends of prescription drug diversion

 

Breakout Sessions C

C-1 - "DEC – the Child Interview and Scene Corroboration" 
Presented by Detective Jennifer Holz,Wausau Police Department, Wausau, Wisconsin  & Jennifer Plisch, Manager and Forensic Interviewer at the Child Advocacy Center of North Central Wisconsin

The life experiences of drug endangered children present unique challenges to the investigative and interview process.  During this session and through the review of cases, participants will identify strategies and techniques that they can then apply in field and forensic interviews of children, corroboration of the crime scene and the importance of working within a multidisciplinary team through Drug Endangered Children and Child Advocacy Center protocols.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Gain greater understanding of importance of multidisciplinary collaboration between DEC cases and CAC Model
  2. Improve interview skills and techniques with relation to forensic interviews of DEC
  3. Improve gathering of corroborating evidence through child forensic interview and scene

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C-2 - "Working with Children in Indian Country: Understanding Jurisdiction and Federal Mandatory Reporting Obligations"
Presented by Leslie Hagen, National Indian Country Training Coordinator, US Department of Justice

The health, safety and welfare of children living in Indian country may be jeopardized by adults using and/or abusing drugs and alcohol. Professionals working in Indian country learning of facts that give reason to suspect that a child has suffered child abuse or neglect may have reporting obligations under tribal, state or federal law. This session will cover the basics of Indian Country criminal jurisdiction, relevant federal statutes mandating the immediate reporting of suspected abuse, to whom the reports must be made, and the legal consequences for failing to report suspected abuse or neglect. In addition, this webinar will cover potential federal charges for cases in Indian country where children have been abused or neglected and rights and protections afforded to child victims in federal court.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Mandatory Reporting Obligations
  2. Rights and Protections Provided to Child Victims in Federal Court
  3. Potential Federal Charges for Exposure to Drugs

 

C-3 - "Neuropsychology of Alcohol and Substance Abuse Disorders: Neurotoxic Sequelae in Infants, Children and Adults"
Presented by Dr. James Lewis, Clinical Neuropsychologist, Consultant, Suncoast Center Pinellas County Child Protection Team,  St. Petersburg, Florida

This presentation differentiates "classic" fetal alcohol syndrome from the underidentified fetal drug and alcohol exposure disorders that create extreme high risk for "subtle" and worse neurodevelopmental disorders (in learning, attention, memory and executive functioning) This session also focuses on applying knowledge of Clinical Neuropsychology to evaluations of brain impairment in you and older children who ingest caregivers' alcohol and on differential diagnosis of frontotemporal disorders in adolescent alcohol/substance abusers (neurotoxic effects on the physiologically immature brain.) The Adult neurotoxicology component addresses the frequent misdiagnosis of bipolar and mood disorders for substance induced mood and cognitive disturbance that "mimics" other psychiatric conditions. The presentation concludes with methods to enhance recovery of function in affected clients.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Have a basic understanding of the under identified neuropsychological consequences of fetal drug and alcohol exposure as differentiated from the predominant medical model that is limited to diagnosis only of Fetal Alcohol Syndrome. Overlooked conditions include "acquired" neurocognitive disorders
  2. Learn about an evaluation model that identifies neurotoxic effects on learning, attention, memory and executive function in you and older children's ingestion of caregivers' alcohol and differential frontotemporal disorders from adolescent alcohol/substance disorder effects on the "physiologically immature" brain
  3. Understand how neuropshychological assessments of adults with alcohol and substance abuse can differentiate "over diagnosed" bipolar mood disorders from under diagnosed substance induced mood and cognitive disturbance. This area of focus will also include how to enhance prognosis for recovery of function
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C-4 - "Secondary Trauma: What Is It and Why Should We Care?"
Presented by Jennifer Sleiter, Pediatric Nurse, Regional Child Protection Center at Blank Children’s Hospital, Des Moines, Iowa & Brenda Bash, Supervisor, Polk County Crisis & Advocacy Services & Darci Patterson, Social Worker Supervisor of a Child/Adult Protective Services, Department of Human Service, Des Moines, Iowa

“There is a cost to caring.” Exposure to traumatic material is mentally, emotionally and physically expensive. For those of us who work amidst other’s trauma, Secondary Traumatic Stress (STS) poses a threat to the quality of service we deliver.  The management of STS is a work performance issue.

This workshop will introduce the concept of Secondary Traumatic Stress and will discuss how STS impacts the ability to provide quality services.  It will demonstrate the connection between chronic exposure to traumatic material and physical, emotional and mental well-being.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Describe what research has shown to be effective in combating STS and reducing its impact on those exposed
  2. Identify practical tools that can be used to increase resilience, improve their service delivery and preserve their quality of life at work and at home

 

C-5 - “Understanding and Utilizing the DEC Approach” Part 1 of 2
Presented by Lieutenant (retired) Eric Nation, Director of Training and Development, National DEC & Stacee Read,  Director of DEC Network Development, National DEC

This presentation focuses on implementing the DEC Approach—the collaborative approach between various practitioners that is essential to improve outcomes for drug endangered children. This presentation will provide insights about how various practitioners—including child welfare professionals, law enforcement officers, prosecutors, probation/parole, medical personnel, educators and treatment providers—are in a position to help identify and report on drug endangered children.  This presentation provides insights about how collaboration among these practitioners leads to better communication and more information about Drug Endangered Children and their families, both of which lead to more informed decisions that can lead to better outcomes for children.  The presenters will also discuss the identification of risks to drug endangered children and what all disciplines can look for when collecting evidence and information on drug endangered children. Presenters will use pictures and videos of real DEC scenarios to assist professionals in understanding what to look for regarding the “life of the child.”

Learning Objectives:

  1. Understand the critical and overlapping roles that professionals have in identifying and protecting drug endangered children
  2. Recognize how our response to drug endangered children transforms after professionals learn about the DEC Approach
  3. Describe how exchanging information and sharing resources enhances the capacity of each discipline
  4. Understand more deeply the risks to children and how to identify them when in collecting evidence and information

 

C-6 - "Drugs & Life: The Two Don’t Mix - Youth Prevention Challenge"
Presented by Commander Jerry Peters, Thornton, Colorado Police Department & Sergeant Jim Gerhardt, North Metro Drug Task Force, Adams and Broomfield Counties, Colorado

The North Metro Drug Task Force and Adams County Youth Initiative partner annually to challenge high school students in an annual drug prevention competition. Participants create drug-free messaging and deliver this information to their fellow students and kids in the local middle schools. Students are encouraged to be imaginative and resourceful in creating their campaign. Over the past three years students have used social media, graphic arts, produced videos, and held the school assemblies as they compete with each other to ultimately win a trophy for their school to display. This session will describe the design and implementation of this project as well as showcase many of the excellent and inspirational work of the students who participate with this project.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Participants will learn about structuring a youth driven prevention effort
  2. Participants will understand the incorporation of survey data in this effort in order to be evidence-based
  3. Participants will learn about the many successes and challenges for this effort that we have experienced in the past three years

 

C-7 – "Human Sex Trafficking and Drug Endangered Children"
Presented by Halleh Seddighzadeh, Ph.D/JDc, Forensic Traumatologist,Asylee Refugee Migrant Assistance Network, Las Vegas, Nevada

This course will cover child sex trafficking throughout the United States and the examination of sex trafficked children who present with histories of drug endangerment.  A three-prong approach of identification, treatment and prosecution will inform our dialogue surrounding the complex issues facing this population. These issues include: 1) Profile and identification of DEC and its intersection with child sex trafficking, 2) Trauma profile and clinical considerations for practitioners across varying fields working with DEC/Trafficking cases and the importance of understanding the nuances of poly-trauma in this population; and 3) Tools and resources for investigators and prosecutors working with DEC/Trafficking cases.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Participants will explore the complex needs of drug-endangered children and how they are at an elevated risk for sex trafficking
  2. Exploratory discussion around potential best practices that can be employed for community agencies, advocates, and clinicians
  3. Address multi-faceted needs and enhance multi-agency collaboration
  4. Participants will be presented with tools and resources to enhance the prosecution process for both prosecutor and child victim


C-8 - "Core Drug Endangered Children Community Awareness Training"
Presented by Commander (retired) Lori Moriarty, Vice President, National DEC

The national strategy for responding to drug endangered children focuses on the formation of multi-disciplinary partnerships that take advantage of existing agency personnel, resources, and responsibilities and coordinate their mutual interests and duties to meet the specific needs of these children.  The focus on these children’s needs lasts throughout the entire process until the child is in a permanent, safe, and positive functioning environment. This session will highlight the risks to children living in dangerous drug environments, the long-term impacts these environments This session includes the highlights of National DEC's popular Core DEC Awareness Program.

Learning Objectives: 

  1. Identify the risks and actual dangers that illegal drug activities present to children
  2. Describe the long-term needs of drug endangered children
  3. Outline the broad concepts of a collaborative response
  4. Explain the advantages presented by a collaborative response in sustaining DEC efforts and engendering broad social change.

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Breakout Sessions D

D-1 - “Law Enforcement Removals, Child Care, Cooperative Information Sharing, and Funding: Exploring Options to Maximize Services”
Presented by Nikki Hartwig, Director at Child Abuse Prevention Services & Ben Stansberry, Assistant County Attorney, Marshall County, Iowa & Detective Sadie Weekely, Marshalltown Police Department, Marshalltown, Iowa

This session will explore the removal of drug endangered children by law enforcement, the components of a crisis nursery/crisis child care program, how a case debriefing can effectively be used by all parties to coordinate services and ensure safe placement of children, and the possibility of using restitution to assist with child care costs.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Understand the benefits of utilizing a Crisis Child Care/Crisis Nursery program for law enforcement removal of drug endangered children, and what is required to establish this program 
  2. Understand how to legally implement the use of DEC case debriefings, and the benefits of cooperative information sharing
  3. Understand what restitution is, and how a program that provides shelter for child victims may be eligible to receive restitution

 

D-2 - "An Innovative Approach for Youth Affected by Alcohol & Drugs"
Presented by Valerie Falls Down, Certified Alcohol & Drug Counselor II, Youth Empowerment Coalition-Crow Tribe

The presenter will share experiences in developing and implementing the Youth Empowerment Coalition in her tribal community, including the obstacles and successes which can serve as examples and lessons learned for other communities.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Participants will learn about an assessment, prevention, and youth empowerment program
  2. Participants will learn about effective practices with parents / grandparents / guardians / caretakers regarding youth who are affected  by alcohol and drug use
  3. Parents will learn about positive changes in the local schools & community with support from Youth Empowerment Coalition Task Force

 

D-4 - "Motivational Interviewing: Reflective Listening"
Presented by Daniel DeFrank, LCSW, Senior Vice President of Clinical Services  Florida

Reflective listening is an art of responding to what a client says. Reflective statements are powerful in eliciting change talk and when skillfully used elicit change talk more often than questions. Reflections vary in complexity from simply repeating back, to reflecting implicit meaning or feelings. Through the strategic use of reflective listening in this evidenced based style of communication you will empower your clients from ambivalence to commitment and from sustain talk to change talk.  This workshop will provide you with advanced skill in the use of reflective listening using five different complex reflections; amplified, double sided reflections, agreement with a twist, siding with the negative and the use of metaphors. Attendees will learn how to strategically rephrase and paraphrase, while modulating your voice to elicit commitment language.   This intensive workshop will provide you with guidelines on using this style of reflective listening. Together we will look at the skillful use of reflections with the readiness ruler and the use of decisional balance. Learning activities will include: video demonstrations, role plays and interactive discussions. 

Learning Objectives:

  1. The attendee will develop an in depth understanding of complex reflections
  2. The attendee will develop competency in using complex reflections
  3. The attendee will be able to demonstrate complex reflections when using the decisional balance sheet and readiness ruler 

 

D-5 - "Understanding and Utilizing the DEC Approach" Part 2 of 2
Presented by Lieutenant (retired) Eric Nation, Director of Training and Development, National DEC & Stacee Read,  Director of DEC Network Development, National DEC

This presentation focuses on implementing the DEC Approach—the collaborative approach between various practitioners that is essential to improve outcomes for drug endangered children. This presentation will provide insights about how various practitioners—including child welfare professionals, law enforcement officers, prosecutors, probation/parole, medical personnel, educators and treatment providers—are in a position to help identify and report on drug endangered children.  This presentation provides insights about how collaboration among these practitioners leads to better communication and more information about Drug Endangered Children and their families, both of which lead to more informed decisions that can lead to better outcomes for children.  The presenters will also discuss the identification of risks to drug endangered children and what all disciplines can look for when collecting evidence and information on drug endangered children. Presenters will use pictures and videos of real DEC scenarios to assist professionals in understanding what to look for regarding the “life of the child.”

Learning Objectives:

  1. Understand the critical and overlapping roles that professionals have in identifying and protecting drug endangered children
  2. Recognize how our response to drug endangered children transforms after professionals learn about the DEC Approach
  3. Describe how exchanging information and sharing resources enhances the capacity of each discipline
  4. Understand more deeply the risks to children and how to identify them when in collecting evidence and information

 

D-6 - “The Medical Effects of Marijuana on Children and Young Adults”
Presented by Dr. Ronald Holmes, MD, Pediatrician & Professor of Pediatrics at the University of Michigan Medical School (retired), CASA Volunteer, Colorado

This presentation includes an overview of: 1) Types of marijuana plants and their contents with specific attention to the known effects of plant cannabinoids; 2) The human “endocannabinoid system” and the deleterious effects of prenatal and natal exposure to exogenous cannabinoids; 3) The neurodevelopmental effects of exposure of the fetus, infant , child and adolescent to THC and the impact on behavior, learning, memory and mental health (including chronic depression and schizophrenia). The discussion includes a review of genetic and environmental factors which enhance the effects of cannabinoids; 4) “Legalization” of marijuana and the effects on children: experiences in Colorado and Washington state; and 5) Medical marijuana: pros and cons.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Have an understanding of the chemical content of the marijuana plant, how the concentrations of the active ingredients have increased over the years and how marijuana is used
  2. Understand the physiologic effects of marijuana on the developing brain of the fetus, infant, child and adolescent
  3. The health consequences of both the casual use and of the chronic, persistent exposure to marijuana
  4. The pros and cons of medicinal marijuana

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D-7 - “'You Are Not Alone!'  Making A Difference In The Lives of Children Of Incarcerated Parents"
Presented by Susan Magestro, Criminologist & Interventionist, Magestro & Associates, LLC

Children of Incarcerated Parents are referred to as the “Invisible Population”. In the United States, it is difficult to know who these children are.  We “guesstimate” there are approximately three million of these children in the United States.  Most of these children are “raised by their relatives” during their parent’s incarceration.  Most are not in state’s custody or in the child welfare system, therefore, they are not identified.  These children suffer on their own the co-lateral damage from their parent’s incarceration. Their challenges are unique as compared to other challenges faced by youth today. This breakout session will describe a program in Alaska as a model and example of success with this critical population. 

Learning Objectives:

  1. Participants will identify characteristics, unique to children of incarcerated parents, from pre-sentencing to parole.
  2. Participants will gain strategies and tools to work with youth who have an incarcerated parent
  3. Participants will learn of the Alaska two-part program  to connect children with their incarcerated parent to facilitate successful re-entry for parents back into their children’s lives after incarceration. 

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D-8 - "DEC Informed Care: San Bernardino Study"
Presented by Dr. Kiti Freier Randall, Director of Psychological Services in the Department of Pediatrics, Loma Linda University Health Care, California & Jenae Holtz, Director of The Desert/Mountain SELPA Children’s Center in Apple Valley, California & Karen Scott, Executive Director of the Children and Families Commission – First 5 San Bernardino, California

Drug endangered children are a significant concern in San Bernardino County, California.  This county has held the title of ‘Methamphetamine Capital’ of the nation.  The concern for the vast numbers of drug endangered children was, in large part, the impetus that prompted various child service providers/funders in San Bernardino County to act on an initiative to identify and appropriately treat this population.  This workshop will detail both the county system of collaboration and the transdisciplinary model of care being utilized successfully for the young endangered child in San Bernardino County.

Learning Objectives:

  1. The participant will learn how a large county system works together to provide treatment for the drug endangered child
  2. The participant will learn how to engage community stakeholders who are important to a sustainable strategy to serve drug endangered  children
  3. The participant will learn about how the transdisciplinary approach works to best intervene with the drug endangered child

 

Thursday, October 9, 2014

Breakout Sessions E

E-1 – “Clandestine Drug Labs and their Lasting Effect on Children and the Community” 
Presented by Joe Mazzuca, CEO of Operations of Meth Lab Cleanup® Company & Julie Mazzuca, Industrial Hygienist and CEO of Meth Lab Cleanup® Company

Residential clandestine drug labs, if left unaddressed, are detrimental to neighborhood home values, are subject to vandalism, are attractive to squatters and are environmental and potential fire hazards. Although twenty-three states and many counties and cities regulate the decontamination of these homes, most regulations are ineffective in their authority to quarantine properties and require remediation. In addition, many governing organizations do not have the personnel and resources to administer the laws. How are clandestine drug labs discovered? Who is responsible and what are the administrative steps taken to certify a property safe for habitation?

Meth Lab Cleanup® Company is the leader in clandestine drug lab testing, decontamination and training throughout the United States. Ten years of experience in this industry has allowed key personnel to examine various state and local policy initiatives; some more effective than others at requiring quarantine and remediation/disclosure or nondisclosure in an effort to maintain.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Promote local and national efforts that mainstream best practices in healthy homes for children. Participants will understand industry standards and best practices from clandestine drug lab discovery to decontamination and certification.
  2. Demonstrate effective evaluation and research towards healthy housing strategies for children. Comparisons of effective and ineffective clandestine drug lab quarantine and remediation regulations will allow participants to understand the challenges of home owners governing agencies and communities addressing these properties.
  3. Present emerging trends in creating, sustaining and maintaining healthy homes for children. Define progressive trends in regulating and governing clandestine drug lab assessment decontamination and certification so participants understand what makes effective programs successful.      

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E-2 - "Creating Trauma Informed Tribal Child Welfare System"
Presented by Eamon Anderson, Child Welfare Specialist, Children’s Bureau-funded Trauma-Informed Tribal Child Welfare Systems Project & Patrick Shannon, Child Welfare Specialist, Children’s Bureau-funded Trauma-Informed Tribal Child Welfare Systems Project

Presenters from the National Native Children’s Trauma Center (NNCTC) will use their experience as a recipient of the Administration for Children and Families “Creating Trauma-Informed Tribal Child Welfare Systems” Grant to present community engagement strategies for the integration of Trauma-Informed Child Welfare Practice in Tribal communities.  Based on the NNCTC’s pilot work in three reservation communities, the presenters will focus on the importance of engaging the entire community and its child-serving systems in trauma-informed child welfare practice initiatives.    The presenters will apply recent real-life implementation successes and challenges to creating trauma-informed Tribal child welfare systems.  At least 15 minutes of the presentation will be reserved for questions and discussion focused on “next steps” of implementation for interested parties.  Participants will receive a resource list outlining all six community engagement strategies, and directions for access to relevant implementation materials.  

Learning Objectives:  

  1. Understand the importance of creating a community-wide trauma-informed system for child welfare
  2. Understand the essential elements of a trauma-informed child welfare system
  3. Learn how to apply at least six different community engagement strategies for the integration of trauma-informed child welfare practice in Tribal communities

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E-3 - "Use of Strategic Interviewing to Assess Parents' Drug Usage"
Presented by John Harper, Program Specialist, Family Safety Program Office, Florida Department of Children and Families

Isn't it remarkable that every user that comes to the attention of law enforcement or the child welfare system was "using for the first time" or "just experimenting?"  This workshop will explore how strategic interviewing (SI) can provide the essential information needed to differentiate when children are in imminent danger from a caregiver's active out-of-control drug use, are in impending danger from pervasive but more latent or embedded family conditions, or are simply at-risk for future maltreatment related to parental drug usage. SI's effectiveness in circumventing the usual resistance encountered when asking questions about drug abuse can best be understood in how more subtle behavioral indicators of drug use and child maltreatment become the focus of the interview.  In most instances, asking direct questions about positive drug tests, DUIs, or prior drug arrests, etc., will only result in pat or canned answers from guarded users, which is counterproductive to accurately identifying drug endangered children.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Identify family dynamics highly correlated with alcohol and other drug abuse
  2. Explore the use of strategic interviewing to identify alcohol and other drug abuse 
  3. Learn to design interventions to address both safety and risk for drug endangered children

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E-4 - “Handle with Care”
Presented by Andrea Darr,Victim Witness Coordinator, West Virginia Prosecuting Attorneys Institute & Lieutenant Chad Napier, Bureau Chief of Investigative Services, Charleston, West Virginia Police Department & Tracy Dorsey Chapman, Victim Witness Coordinator for the U.S. Attorney’s Office

"Handle with Care" is a program aimed at ensuring that children who are exposed to violence in their home, school or community receive appropriate interventions to help them achieve academically at their highest levels despite whatever traumatic circumstances they may have endured.  “Handle with Care” is an initiative currently being piloted at Mary C. Snow West Side Elementary School in Charleston, WV.  

Learning Objectives:

  1. Participants will learn how trauma affects a child's ability to learn at school
  2. Participants will understand the role of law enforcement, schools and mental health professionals in the "Handle with Care" program
  3. Participants will be given tools and resources to start a "Handle with Care" program in their community

 

E-5 - "Practical Approach to Introducing DEC into the Courtroom"
Presented by Jean Powers, Guardian ad Litem, Office of Child Representation, Respondent Parent’s Attorney, Criminal Defense Attorney, Mental Health Court and Probate Attorney, Colorado &  Chris Corken, First Assistant County Attorney, Dubuque, Iowa & Marilee McWilliams,Assistant County, Dependency and Neglect, Arapahoe County, Colorado

Professionals will outline opportunities and strategies to create a DEC awareness in the courtroom, promote collaboration among all disciplines, and promote a round table approach that is inclusive and flexible.  

Learning Objectives:  

  1. Participants will have specific strategies to infuse DEC into criminal, child welfare, and dissolution matters as attorneys
  2. Participates will understand the scope and tools available to attorney’s to expand DEC awareness
  3. Participants will be introduced to multiple discipline round table approaches to create sustainable change in their communities

 

E-6 - "Opioid Dependence and Treatment in Pregnancy: Medical & State Responses" 
Presented by Dr. Loretta Finnegan, MD, President, Finnegan Consulting, LLC & Dr. Robert Newman, MD, MPH, President Emeritus, Beth Israel Medical Center & Kylee Sunderlin, Soros Justice Fellow, National Advocates for Pregnant Women

The Office of National Drug Control Policy has stated that the misuse of opioid analgesics is the country's fastest growing drug problem. As a result, newborns are increasingly being diagnosed with Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome (NAS and states are proposing a variety of legislative responses. This course will walk attendees through opioid treatment - from addiction treatment to assessing and treating NAS in newborns to child welfare interventions. New data on methods to mitigate NAS symptoms utilizing specialized and basic clinical techniques during pregnancy and in the neonatal period will teach attendees how to reduce NAS risks, decrease severity of NAS, and reduce health costs associated with its treatment. By highlighting well-established evidence-based medical practices, this panel will focus on improving health care and treatment while permitting child welfare services to focus resources on parents and children in need of their services.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Participants will know the accepted treatment options for opioid-dependent pregnant women and understand the potentially life-threatening risks associated with abrupt discontinuation and/or wide swings in concentration of opioids, including fetal distress and pregnancy loss, as well as maternal relapse to nonmedical opioid use and its many associated dangers
  2. Participants will be able to utilize objective criteria for assessing signs and symptoms of NAS, including the ways in which the timing of pharmacologic treatment can affect the severity and duration of NAS symptoms, and how supportive measures like rooming in and breastfeeding can provide comfort and minimize NAS symptoms
  3. Participants will be better equipped to collaborate with various systems and disciplines to prevent child abuse and neglect by promoting more effective efforts to identify and provide services for children and families affected by opioid dependence


E-7 - "Marijuana and Risks to Children"
Presented by Paul Doering, Distinguished Service Professor, Department of Pharmacy Practice, University of Florida College of Pharmacy

With the passage of laws allowing recreational use of marijuana in two states and the recognition of medical marijuana in 21 states and the District of Columbia, entrepreneurs are beginning to diversify the forms in which marijuana is distributed. Now there are formulations of soda pop, candies, fruit bars, gummy bears, and other dosage forms that could easily be mistaken by young children as candy. It is important for those working to decrease the problems caused when adults choose to use drugs to know how to recognize and advise against the use of these dosage forms. This presentation will focus on the various edible forms of marijuana and will also feature other ways in which marijuana can be used e.g., the Volcano Vaporizer. 

Learning Objectives:

  1. Recognize the newer forms in which medical and recreational marijuana is used
  2. Discuss the difference in the way in which orally administered marijuana affects the body compared with smoked marijuana
  3. Advise clients on what steps to take in case a child accidentally ingests one of the edible forms of marijuana

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E-8 - "The Social DEC Autopsy – Case Studies for First Responders & Child Protection; An Analysis of Drug Related Investigations"
Presented by Police Officer (retired) Vanessa Price, Faculty, National Drug Court Institute, Oklahoma Bureau of Narcotics, Federal Law Enforcement Training Institute & DA Investigator (retired) Sue Webber-Brown,Executive Director of Drug Endangered Children Training and Advocacy Center, Butte County, Oroville, California

This session is organized around a verbal autopsy and visual timeline debriefing of three authentic abuse cases causing child deaths in California.  This exercise requires attendee participation to map the chain of events both by law enforcement and social services, with dates, times and circumstances, aimed at identifying contributing factors.  In these circumstances and hundreds of others, the children’s deaths were avoidable.  Law Enforcement and Social Services will readily see the common matrix in drug and child endangerment cases that require the expertise of both disciplines.  Understanding their vital role as a team member, and learning from past mistakes, will give way to a new found appreciation for what they can accomplish together. In this case study, the attendees will realize the requirement, necessity and importance of cross reporting detailed information in a case referral format, and how to minimize the receipt of multiple reports or complaints.   Using information garnered from combined reports and routine investigative practices, attendee’s will be able to prepare and author DEC search warrants, effectively execute operational plans, systematic search, documentation, collect evidence,  prepare detailed reports, identify other experts, conduct suspect/witness/victim interviews,   complete follow-up as requested by prosecutor, provide expert court room testimony and timely deliver your recommendation for sentencing.  The reward is substantial when there is a collective effort to prevent children from mistreatment, neglect, and possible death.  Additionally, the projected benefit can reduce trauma to all involved and avoid costly lawsuits.  

Learning Objectives:

  1. Learners will identify contributing factors in a drug related child death case and discuss corrective changes to ensure a prompt response by critical partners. Discussions will include recommendations on criteria required to: 1) make a casual home visit, 2) conduct a probation search 3) author a search warrant, and 4) make a detention
  2. Learners will verbally identify three (3) obstacles preventing them from a timely team response (Within 24 – 48 hours) and find solutions to ensure case is properly investigated and children are safe
  3. Learners will, in collaboration with other disciplines, identify theories of child endangerment, learn how to capture and store pertinent investigative information; use combined historical information and data to author a search warrant, properly search, document and diagram crime scene, conduct Suspect/Witness interviews and have a clear understanding of desired court room testimony
  4. Identify ways to reduce trauma to child victim, family, witnesses, case handlers, and other affected professionals, including foster parents and service providers

 

Breakout Sessions F

F-1 - "Resiliency for DEC Professionals" 
Presented by Gayle Thom, Victim Witness Coordinator, South Dakota Highway Patrol, FBI Victim Specialist (retired), Rapid Deployment and Evidence Response Teams

No segment of our society is immune from drug abuse, violence or trauma involving or witnessed by children. How many times have you been asked, “How can you DO this work?” Reasons we are drawn to become one who works drug exposed children cases may be as varied as the disciplines involved, including law enforcement, child protection, prosecutors, judges, treatment providers, medical professionals, EMS and other first responders, mental health, community-based services, substance abuse services, home visitation, educators, day care providers, guardians ad litem, probation and correctional officers, and others who work on behalf of drug endangered and maltreated children. Regardless of our role, the secondary trauma of seeing and hearing the many details when working drug cases involving children can have a disturbing effect on us as professionals and yes, on our families as well. The trainer’s experience responding to drug endangered children and violent crime in tribal communities, half of which involved child sexual abuse cases, provides first-hand insight. Participants will learn practical and effective steps that can be taken to build resiliency not only within themselves, but also in staff and volunteers. Yours is important work. Resiliency is the key to being able to DO this work well and continue to make a positive difference in the lives of those where you are most needed both at home and at work. Be warned: No matter your knowledge, skills, and abilities or how hardy you believe yourself to be, the tips and insights this training provides are not all easy to live out!

Learning Objectives:

  1. Identify five core components and how each can assist us in caring for our own health and strengthen our resiliency to continue to effectively do this important work on behalf of drug endangered and maltreated children
  2. Recognize employing agencies/organizations’ responsibilities and learn strategies for building resiliency within
  3. Resiliency Resources: Participants will be equipped for future reference with extensive categorized, research-based professional development resources. This emerging reference library is ideal for ongoing application.

 

F-2 - "Protecting the Next Generation: Drug and Alcohol Use During Pregnancy"
Presented by Dr. Ashley Bayer, MD, Pediatrician, Seminole Tribe of Florida

This presentation reviews the different types of drugs (drugs and alcohol) and the effects they have on infants in utero and after they are born. The presenter discusses the financial impact that this has on the community and state and also discusses opportunities for prevention through contraception. She will offer suggestions for collaboration between departments to help a team approach for providing care.

Learning Objectives:

  1. To understand the types of drug exposures most commonly seen in today's society
  2. To understand the short- and long-term physical effects of drug and alcohol exposed infants
  3. To understand the short- and long-term financial effects of drug and alcohol exposed infants
  4. To understand prevention and reduction of drug exposed infants through contraception
  5. To understand developmental patterns in children prenatally exposed to drugs and alcohol

 

F-3 - "A Collaborative Approach to Social Issues in Indian Country"
Presented by Edward Reina, member of Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian Community (Akimel O’odham), retired Chief of Police for four tribes, Director of Public Safety for the Tohono O’odham Nation, lifetime member of the International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP) Indian Country Law Enforcement Section.

This session will provide participants with brief information on the history of the Indian Country political structure as well as the social issues that continue to disrupt Native American Communities.  These will lead into information about a collaborative method the presenter has utilized in Indian Country for many years to reduce family violence, substance abuse, and socially unacceptable misconduct.  The presenter will show that through this collaborative method, disciplines can assist children and adults through the cost effective use of community services and resources, including services from local, State, Federal and other agencies. 

Participants will :

  1. Describe the Indian Country political structure as well as the social issues that continue to disrupt Native American Communities.
  2. Understand the collaborative method utilized by the presenter in Indian Country to reduce family violence, substance abuse, and socially unacceptable misconduct.
  3. Understand the importance of utilizing a collaborative approach to social issues.

 

F-4 - “Perils of Drug Abuse-Walk With Me”
Presented by Chief (retired) Mitch Brown,Director of Training, Drug Endangered Children Training and Advocacy Center (DEC-TAC), Indian Country consultant, Inter-Tribal Council of California, Co-chair, Butte County Inter-Tribal Task Force, Member, Indian Country committee of the International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP).

This course is an overview of a 4-hour pilot project in California designed as a segment of a drug recovery program for person(s) with a drug abuse issue who are in custody at a correctional facility and/or participates of an alternative program. Using the basics from the DEC Program inmates discuss the dangers of drug abuse for themselves, children, family and community. Inmates are administered a test to find their Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE) score. Subsequent discussions include toxic stress, trauma & protective factors. Attendees of this course will receive information on the pilot projects curriculum, learning goals, challenges/opportunities of teaching inmates, inmate feed-back, open and honest communications, ACE scores, need for informed trauma care, lessons learned, preliminary outcomes and requirements for instructors/presenters.  

Learning Objectives:

  1. Learners will interpret and debate the pilot projects worthiness and discuss suggested changes for implementation in their communities
  2. Learners will list seven of the ten risk factors to inmates based on the Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE) Study and explain the value of finding their ACE score
  3. Learners will discuss how to effect a positive behavior change, abstaining from drugs, in inmates who have substance abusing issues 
  4. Learners must recognize toxic stress and trauma as barriers to successful outcomes

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Handouts to download:

 

F-5 – “The Nuts & Bolts of Building a DEC Alliance DEC: From the Removal Process to Helping Break the Cycle”
Presented by Scott Nicholson, First Assistant County Attorney in Newton, Iowa & Detective Chad Plowman, Newton, IA Police Department, Mid-Iowa Narcotics Enforcement (MINE) Task Force, Jasper County, Iowa 

This presentation will describe the basic approach Jasper County, Iowa took when developing their local DEC alliance. From identifying partners and establishing a common goal to developing tools and guidelines for best practices once children have been identified as drug endangered children, the Jasper County DEC Alliance changed the way illegal drug cases were viewed and investigated by recognizing “children + drugs = risk,” which made every drug case a potential child endangerment case as well. Specifically, Iowa has a statute that allows law enforcement officers to remove children without a court order or parental consent if they find the child in “imminent danger.” This presentation will highlight the evidence collection process used to assist both law enforcement and child welfare. Additionally, members of the alliance will discuss the decision making process they use to help determine the best overall response to protect the children and provide services to the family.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Understand the basic process Jasper County, Iowa used to help develop their local DEC alliance
  2. Learn about Iowa’s statute that allows law enforcement to remove children based on “imminent danger” and the evidence collected to describe the “imminent danger”
  3. Learn about the decision-making process the DEC alliance professionals use when determining their overall response based on the circumstances of each case

 

F-6 - "Assessing Child Maltreatment in Multicultural Populations"
Presented by Dr. Walter Lambert, MD, Pediatrician with the University of Miami School of Medicine, Associate Professor of Clinical Pediatrics and the Medical Director of the Child Protection Team for Miami-Dade County and the Florida Keys

As the United States becomes increasingly multicultural, religious rites and cultural practices can be reported to state abuse hotlines as suspicious for child maltreatment.  Conversely, parents can claim that a parenting practice is cultural as an excuse for maltreatment.  This workshop uses case presentations to explore the interaction between these factors.  The audience is actively involved regarding decisions during the case discussion. 

Learning Objectives:

  1. Understand the spectrum of cultural practices and folk treatments
  2. Become aware of how the clinician’s own culture affects assessments and decision making
  3. Explain the difference between child rearing cultural practices and maltreatment issues

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F-7 - "Marijuana Legalization in Colorado and the Consequences to Children"
Presented by Sergeant Jim Gerhardt, North Metro Drug Task Force, Adams and Broomfield Counties, Colorado

In 2012, Colorado allowed for the legalization of marijuana through a voter initiative known as Amendment 64. This session will delve into the recent history that resulted in Colorado's legalization of marijuana and take a look at what is REALLY happening post legalization. The session will cover a broad arena of topics including youth use issues as well as all of the problems associated with marijuana and drug endangered children. This session will examine this unprecedented "social experiment" with drug legalization and the numerous unintended consequences associated with it.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Learn the history of the marijuana legalization movement in Colorado
  2. Understand the overwhelming challenges confronting public safety professionals post legalization
  3. Review the impact to children during this era of marijuana legalization

 

F-8 - "Trauma-Informed Care for Drug Endangered Children"
Presented by Dr. Kim Fielding, MD, Project Director for a federal grant provided by SAMHSA and the National Child Traumatic Stress Network

Trauma-Informed Care (TIC) is more than a mental health buzzword or fad that is going to go by the wayside; it is supported by both neurological research and exciting stories of recovery. However, not all disciplines are familiar with the concepts, terminology, or processes associated with TIC. With the artful techniques of conveying information, this course delivers vital content through metaphors and object lessons that “stick.” For example, participants retain their understanding of TIC by the presenter’s use of a four-tier ladder. Participants increase their value of a TIC approach by the presenter’s use of a soda pop bottle. Finally, the presenter refers to the brain’s functioning as a result of trauma in a manner that evokes marvel and hope for recovery. The content is easily transferrable to the various disciplines relying on DEC efforts—law enforcement, courts, child advocacy, child protection, and various child-serving professionals. Participants can leave the session equipped with knowledge, values, and skills related to DEC’s mission to meet the needs of children.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Participants will be able to apply the overall framework for trauma-informed care to their respective child-serving professional practice due to the ladder metaphor
  2. Participants will be able to state a clear definition of mental health trauma, it’s possible sources, and potential reactions due to object lessons and use of “everyday” symbols
  3. Participants will be able to describe the ability to detect trauma reactions based on the application of a “trauma lens” perspective due to the soda pop bottle object lesson
  4. Participants will be able to collect an array of techniques for responding when a child may be experiencing a trauma reminder and/or reaction event due to models and discussion regarding the brain
  5. Participants will be able to characterize ways they can make their respective child-serving professional practice more trauma-informed due to “kernel” metaphor

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Closing Plenary

"The Voice of the Children of Incarcerated Parents"
Presented by Susan Magestro, Criminologist & Interventionist, Magestro & Associates, LLC

The Voices of the Children of Incarcerated Parents is a presentation and topic getting attention throughout the United States. It is “guesstimated” there are approximately three million children in the United State who have an incarcerated parent or a parent on parole. This presentation focuses on the characteristics of the children of incarcerated parents, how to identify who these children are, and provide strategies and tools for professionals to use with these youth. When a professional knows the right tools and interventions to use with these children, they can better assist the children to have a more successful, productive lives. Many of these children are imploding as well as exploding, yet adults in their lives do not know why.  Many are drug endangered children who have been at risk of neglect and abuse and have experienced trauma in their lives. Anger issues and self -injurious behavior are indicative of this population. When a professional can identify these characteristics and intervene, the youth has less of a chance of inter-generational incarceration and following in their parent’s footsteps.  Ms. Magestro will end this presentation with a small piece “Making A Difference In The Lives Of The Children” and how each of us can play a critical role in changing the trajectory of a child’s life.

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